Home/Tag:sagging

The Benefits of Facial Massage

By | 2018-09-05T21:29:38+00:00 April 23rd, 2018|Cosmetic Procedures, FaceWorkshops, Facial Ageing, Facial Massage, Facial Yoga|

In preparation for my talk on touch at the Anti-Ageing Conference in London, I am looking at evidence for facial massage. Massage appears to influence the entire face and this may be one reason why visual evaluation is difficult. The combination of 3D-CT analysis (enables us to recognize anatomical changes in the subcutaneous structures of the face) and visual assessment helps to evaluate the effects of facial massage in detail. The nasolabial folds are groove-like structures running outside of the nasal alae and the corners of the mouth. They are easy to evaluate visually. The adipose tissue out-side of the nasolabial folds is thick and forms the shape of the cheek.  Facial massage method: Using cosmetic cream as a lubricant, facial skin and muscles were massaged relaxing the muscles and promoting blood and lymph flow. The massage procedure (5 min long, repeated twice): 1) kneading the entire facial muscles with a finger tip, 2) upward rubbing from the bottom to top of the face with a whole finger (from jaw line, to cheek, forehead, and eyes)  3) rubbing from the bottom to the top of the face with all four fingers RESULTS: Facial massage caused morphological changes at multiple locations on the face: a) the subcutaneous soft tissue around the jaw tightened, soft tissues moved upwards at sites around the jaw b) the thickness of fat tissue at the nasal

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Interview with The Eco Well: Episode 1

By | 2018-07-12T21:20:16+00:00 February 20th, 2018|FaceWorkshops, Facial Ageing, In the Media, Skin Concerns|

My interview with The EcoWell in Canada on skin biology and skin ageing. Enjoy! In this episode, we covered skin biology, including the structure of your skin as it relates to cosmetics, skin conditions like acne, the ageing process of your skin, and lots more. Listen to the podcast here.

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London ‘Power Facials’ in Yorkshire

By | 2016-12-11T20:27:29+00:00 December 9th, 2016|FaceWorkshops, Facial Massage|

In the New Year, we will be discussing the "power facial" and "face gym" as an alternative to Botox. All of the most sought-after London facialists are offering facial massage-based treatments: Nicola Joss is renowned for incorporating internal mouth work into her facial massage to reduce tension and loosen the jaw. Deborah Mitchell treats Botox-free celebrities with LIA therapy technique, a nonsurgical healing facelift, to tighten the skin and clear sinuses. Amanda Lacey promotes facial manipulation to redefine, soften and relax the face, so it looks natural. There is no need to travel to London to appreciate a "facial with a difference". My facial massage based treatments are on a par with the London offerings for a fraction of the price. The FaceWorkshops Anti-Ageing Massage treatment is an advanced massage sequence of ten complementary steps - backed up with science - brings your face back to life. It makes you instantly feel and look good and if done regularly, it will stimulate and tone your facial muscles and lift and contour the face, giving it a better definition. All facials need commitment. All facials need commitment - they are no one-hit wonder. If you come once, it will give you a glow. Ideally, you would have a course of treatments close together and come back regularly for top-ups. As

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French Women’s Attitudes to Ageing

By | 2016-12-07T10:22:34+00:00 July 29th, 2016|Aesthetic Rules & Beauty, FaceWorkshops, Facial Ageing, Skin Concerns|

  One thousand French women took part in the beauty survey - let's look at their views on attitudes toward beauty and ageing (perceptions of internal and external age) and concerns about skin ageing and “preventative” measures employed (lifestyle choices and skin care). The research shows that the majority of women become aware of facial ageing in their mid-30s, when fine lines appear and they feel looking tired. This survey captures the views of French women - it would be interesting to identify cultural variations in Britain. Attitudes towards beauty. Younger faces are considered to be more attractive than older faces - with older female faces being the least appealing. Skin condition - in particular colour and texture - is an important indicator of youth, health, and physical attractiveness. The peak of beauty was judged at an average age of 36 years. Nevertheless, 92% also thought it was possible to grow old “beautifully” - the main factors for facial beauty were a natural look, self-confidence, and attractive skin. Nearly 80% of women feel younger, and believe themselves to look younger, than their true age. As women reach their mid-30s, a gap starts to develop between the age they feel inside [internal age] and the age reflected by their faces [external age] - even though they

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Beauty Sleep: Beneficial or Damaging?

By | 2016-12-07T09:56:06+00:00 March 9th, 2016|Facial Ageing, Skin Concerns, Skincare Research, Society of Cosmetic Scientists, Wellbeing|

Long, sound and refreshing sleep for facial beauty Much of beauty is based on scientific advances, particularly in skincare. The Sleep Report (2014) compiled by This Works (and brought to my attention by Sunday Times) quotes research from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm reporting that "an adequate nights sleep helps make a person look more attractive". The report makes for an interesting read.  I experience first hand how lack of sleep (or even interrupted sleep) affects the skin - anxiety and fatigue can make even the face of a young woman look drawn and prematurely aged. Sleeping on one side promoting sleep lines? The quality of sleep matters but also which side of the face people sleep on makes a difference - leading to sagging and "sleep lines" discussed in previous blog. Or does it? My SCS colleague, Daniel Whitby from Cornelius highlighted a recent US study (2013) stating that "sleep side preference was not significantly correlated with the appearance of wrinkles or sagging". The participant cohort included 41 right-sided and 23 left-sided female sleepers in Michigan. My clinical experience concurs with previous study (1999; carried out in Miami and confirming the initial work by Dr. Samuel J. Stegman on sleep creases) that lines are truly more pronounced on the sleeping side. Searching for solutions, recent research (2015) offers a review of this area and promotes sleeping

Ageing Face & Lifestyle

By | 2016-12-07T09:33:00+00:00 October 31st, 2011|Aesthetic Rules & Beauty, Facial Ageing, Skin Concerns|

Bad Lifestyle Habits Impact on Your Facial Ageing These photos speak for themselves. Drinking, smoking and junk food affect our appearance in the long-term. The 42-year-old freelance journalist Anna Magee worked with a forensic artist to create images of what she’d look like 10 years from now adopting different lifestyles.  She admits to having cheek fillers and Botox injections in the past. The three projected images show her face 10 years from now: SMOKING After 10 years of smoking a pack of cigarettes a day. Please note the deep wrinkles, dark under-eye circles, and sagging brow, eyelids, and cheeks. A survey of over 1,000 Yahoo! users found that only 28% of smokers admit to being addicted and dependent on cigarettes with 72% claiming “I choose when I smoke and can go without at any time.” 41% of the people ages 18-34 said they only smoke in a social setting, but if you want to avoid these nasty signs of aging, every cigarette may count. Fifty-six percent of people ages 18-34 said they smoke when drinking.

The Habit of Frowning “Computer Face”

By | 2016-12-07T08:58:57+00:00 September 30th, 2010|Facial Yoga, Skin Concerns|

There is a growing evidence that more women in office-based jobs are developing a "computer face" and premature signs of ageing. Working long hours in front of a computer screen results - in a decade or so - in sagging  jawline, "turkey neck" and deep-set wrinkles on the forehead and around the eyes. It is a habit. When stressed or thinking hard, people often put on a grumpy face to appear more serious.  Concentration leads to frowning and squinting that overtime brings on the frown lines. Sagging is due to shortened neck muscles and sitting in one position for too long.  This repetition leads to pre-mature signs of ageing - and in two decades of looking at the screen - these may be really significant. To me, it is not the Botox but small changes to break the habit include: taking regular screen breaks stretching neck muscles - Dr Prager, a London cosmetic surgeon, also recommends "Kiss the ceiling" exercise we teach in facial yoga classes and raise your computer screen higher so that you are not looking downwards at it. Come for facial yoga tuition or organise a facial yoga party. Source: Eccles, L. Screens put years on you.  Daily Mail Sep 2010.

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Are You Ageing Well?

By | 2016-12-07T09:08:01+00:00 June 2nd, 2010|Facial Ageing, Skincare Research|

We all want to look good for our age but we age at a different rate! French research shows that women of the same age living in the Paris area (with relatively homogeneous genetics and lifestyle) can look 10 years younger or 10 years older for their age. Skin type and avoiding extreme lifestyle behaviours (suntanning, diet and smoking) explain only 10 % of this variation! It is the more subtle genetic and lifestyle factors e.g. stress as well as our skincare routines that are of greater importance in terms of how well we age. Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12437451

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Facial Expressions Lead to Permanent Wrinkles at 40

By | 2016-12-07T08:22:48+00:00 February 10th, 2010|Facial Yoga, Skincare Research, Skincare Tips|

From Temporary Lines to Permanent Wrinkles Wrinkles develop progressively through our lives. When young, we only see temporary lines when making a facial expression. Later in life, lines and wrinkles become visible permanently. It is the mechanical stress caused by repeated facial expressions along the same skin groove that makes temporary lines become permanent wrinkles. The most significant period of change is in the 40s!  Light skin tone and low hydration make our skin more prone to wrinkling. Also a low intake of water and a belief that tanned skin is healthy looking skin will contribute. A Tipping Point Research presented at the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in San Francisco shows that skin elasticity and resilience has a tipping point at about 35 years of age. Compressing the skin of a 20-year old and that of a 40-year old skin with the same amout of stress and force - a skin compression imaging device - shows a big difference in the ability of the skin to withstand pressure. In a study of 100 women aged 25 - 55, skin power gradually declined through their 20's and early 30s but dropped precipitously at their mid thirties. This is due to collagen and elastin, skin's two main structural components, being damaged by oxidation (UV rays, pollution and intrinsic stress).

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