Home/Tag:Procter & Gamble

Visible Results, Relevant to Consumers

By | 2017-01-07T17:05:51+00:00 November 28th, 2016|Facial Ageing, Facial Yoga, Skincare Research|

In their recent paper on Evolutionary Psychology of Physical Attraction and the Role of Skin Condition in Perception of Beauty published by the IFSCC magazine, the authors have quantified the visible difference in perception of skin colour and surface topography: In the forehead and the peri-orbital area, the study participants were able to detect as low as a 20% change in skin surface topography.  In terms of skin colour distribution, a smoothing of inhomogeneity as low as 25% has a significant effect on facial heath perception. Visible signs of facial ageing impact on how attractive we appear to others. Since 2007, Procter & Gamble have invested into facial attractiveness research that demonstrates that uneven skin coloration - as well as lines and wrinkles - matter in our perception of our facial age and attractiveness! Whilst lines & wrinkles code for age, colour relates to perceived health of the individual. Whilst uneven coloration matters, forehead lines and wrinkles are the top concern of my clients. Managing their expectations in terms of discernible results deliverable by their skincare routine is essential. The research paper by Samson et al [2010] relates to their age group, ethnicity [and severity scale of the concerns] : Perception and noticeability of skin surface topography was studied by computer manipulation of six facial images of British women, aged 45–65 years. All

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Next – After the Boots Serum?

By | 2016-11-28T12:25:27+00:00 February 15th, 2010|Product Reviews, Skincare Research, Skincare Shopping|

As discussed in my previous blog, Boots had an unprecedented commercial success in Britain in the past few years.  The Boots Protect & Perfect serum case gave clear evidence to the skincare industry that a little science could do a lot more for sales than any amount of expensive glossy advertising! The latest attempt to promote a skincare product through serious scientific scrutiny, this time by Procter & Gamble, hopes to emulate the success of Boots and provide us with a proof of superior efficacy! This month the British Journal of Dermatology will publish a scientific study showing that an anti-ageing cream, Olay Pro-X, is as efficacious at reducing wrinkles as a prescription-only treatment. In the study, 99 women who applied the Olay product several times a day for six months were compared to other 97 women receiving prescription-only retinoid treatment with well-known efficacy. Wrinkle reduction was assessed by grading on high-resolution digital images at eight and 24 weeks into the trial and showed that an appropriately designed cosmetic regimen can improve facial wrinkle appearance comparably with the benchmark prescription treatment and without its side effects. P&G plans to launch Olay Pro-X in Britain next year! And the active ingredients look great - more about them in my next blog. Source: http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/beauty/article7026342.ece

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Facial Expressions Lead to Permanent Wrinkles at 40

By | 2016-12-07T08:22:48+00:00 February 10th, 2010|Facial Yoga, Skincare Research, Skincare Tips|

From Temporary Lines to Permanent Wrinkles Wrinkles develop progressively through our lives. When young, we only see temporary lines when making a facial expression. Later in life, lines and wrinkles become visible permanently. It is the mechanical stress caused by repeated facial expressions along the same skin groove that makes temporary lines become permanent wrinkles. The most significant period of change is in the 40s!  Light skin tone and low hydration make our skin more prone to wrinkling. Also a low intake of water and a belief that tanned skin is healthy looking skin will contribute. A Tipping Point Research presented at the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in San Francisco shows that skin elasticity and resilience has a tipping point at about 35 years of age. Compressing the skin of a 20-year old and that of a 40-year old skin with the same amout of stress and force - a skin compression imaging device - shows a big difference in the ability of the skin to withstand pressure. In a study of 100 women aged 25 - 55, skin power gradually declined through their 20's and early 30s but dropped precipitously at their mid thirties. This is due to collagen and elastin, skin's two main structural components, being damaged by oxidation (UV rays, pollution and intrinsic stress).

Twiggy Advert for Olay Ruled as ‘Misleading’

By | 2016-12-06T21:59:20+00:00 December 16th, 2009|Skincare Shopping|

ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) ruled that Twiggy's advertising campaign for an Olay eye cream was "misleading" because the wrinkles around her eyes had been airbrushed out. Procter and Gamble, the company behind Olay, withdrew the advert as the row developed over the summer. The promotional campaign claimed that the £24.99 cream: “Reduces the look of wrinkles and dark circles for brighter, younger-looking eyes. More than 700 people complained that the advert had been digitally retouched, but gave the false impression that the Olay "Definity Eye Illuminator" alone was responsible for keeping the former supermodel, 60, virtually line free. Accusations that it was misleading were upheld by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). An ASA spokesman said: “We considered that the post-production retouching of this ad, specifically in the eye area, could give consumers a misleading impression of the effect the product could achieve. “We considered that the combination of references to ‘younger-looking eyes’, including the claim: ‘Reduces the look of wrinkles and dark circles for brighter, young-looking eyes’, and post-production retouching of Twiggy’s image around the eye area was likely to mislead.” But the ASA said the public expected some glamour in images advertising beauty products and would expect Twiggy to be professionally styled and made up. It added that the image was aimed

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