/Uncategorised

Skincare: Science-based or emotional choice?

By |2019-04-03T21:04:31+00:00April 2nd, 2019|Uncategorised|

Skincare science or emotion? This is a debate which will be discussed at the In-Cosmetics 2019 Exhibition in Paris, which I am going to this week. Overall, the event should reveal the new ingredients and trends we’ll be hearing more about in the coming months and years. I attend so that I can meet with old friends and colleagues, and to visit the Innovation Zone. But one interesting issue for debate is the suggestion by Dr Karl Lintner, in this workshop at the exhibition, that cosmetic science has reached a ceiling - I cannot help but agree.  The science of molecular biology and genetics or epigenetics has advanced our understanding of cellular mechanisms but consumers do not buy products only on the scientific evidence which emerges from such research. New concepts – blue light, anti-pollution protection, microbiome and new ingredients – cannot supersede the ‘human’ take on buying skincare, which is driven by pleasure and emotional choice. Some time ago, a study carried out by a large cosmetics company which looked at the "skincare science or emotion?" question concluded that approximately 95% of the purchase criteria for a cosmetic product is based on the texture. In my personalisation-based projects, I also consider skincare science or emotion and believe that achieving a great skin-feel

Personalisation in Skincare

By |2019-03-18T19:59:54+00:00March 20th, 2019|Facial Ageing, Skincare Tips, Uncategorised|

Personalisation in skincare is essential. As a clinician, I treat people from all walks of life – different ages, skin types and concerns – on a daily basis. There is a range of skin types but also motivation, compliance and budget amongst my clients. My role is to help them make an informed choice, to diagnose their skin type and make a product as well as lifestyle recommendations. The majority come back on a monthly basis and incorporate my recommendations into their routines at home. Skincare is a journey. I am honest with my clients in discussing what can and cannot be achieved in a month, a season or a year. Prevention is best for healthy, glowing and youthful skin. The younger generation are interested in health and prevention of premature ageing; in the older generation many people only address a concern once it becomes visible. Every face has individual facial structures that relate to the skin as well as the skeleton, facial muscles and the vascular and lymphatic systems. The facial tissues represent a dynamic system, influenced by health and lifestyle, responding to daily and monthly rhythms and ageing. The skincare industry approaches customisation on a macro level (skin type and concern, age groups) or micro-level (gene-analysis based skincare) but in the absence of large personal spending, clinically relevant solutions lie in understanding of individuals’ facial

The Science of Massage for Different Skin Types

By |2019-03-18T19:58:54+00:00March 18th, 2019|Facial Ageing, Uncategorised, Wellbeing|

Merck, as a large personal care ingredients manufacturer, aim to be at the forefront of innovation, debating scientific topics that are relevant and on trend. Their annual forum brings together primarily scientists from the German-speaking world carrying out research in microbiome, pollution and, in my case, touch. It is a privilege to be invited to Darmstadt, Germany, this Wednesday, to share my clinical expertise in a talk about “The Science of Massage for Different Skin Types”. We understand that sensory properties of skincare products – the texture, scent and skin feel – enhance the perceived wellbeing that results from their use. When developing new products, it is therefore important to understand how an individual’s skin type, age and ethnicity can affect their experience. Different application touch techniques can impact skin biology in different ways and this is where the science of massage is relevant. For example, the slow and deep techniques relax the brain, bring in more blood flow and stretch the collagen, producing dermal fibroblasts, collagen-making cells that get less active with ageing which leads to skin thinning, more wrinkles and sagging. By contrast, the light touch techniques refresh and drain the superficial lymphatic system, something which our bodies do less effectively as we get older, causing puffiness and sagging. Evidence-based

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